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By John B.F. Miller

Using narrative feedback to supply a entire exam of the goals and visions in Luke-Acts, this learn highlights these passages during which characters interpret their visionary encounters (e.g., the infancy narrative, Sauls/Pauls conversion, the Cornelius-Peter episode, and Pauls dream at Troas).

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In addition to the many other texts that may contain allusions to Od. 50 Herodotus offers an interesting example. In Hist. 10–17, Artabanus attempts to dissuade Xerxes from marshalling an expedition against the Greeks. Xerxes has had a dream in which he has been instructed not to disband his expedition against Greece. He is so disturbed by this dream that he asks Artabanus to wear his clothes, sit on his throne, and then sleep on his bed; Xerxes’ assumption is that the dream will appear also to Artabanus, if indeed it is from the gods.

Nah 1:1 and Obad 1). There is a rich diversity in the portrayal of visionary phenomena in these texts. The present discussion focuses on the reliability of dream-visions as a source of revelation. , form-critical issues and comparisons between the biblical texts and other evidence from antiquity). Therefore, I will engage this scholarship only in a limited way. Questions of form criticism are discussed in Ernst Ludwig Ehrlich’s Der Traum im Alten Testament (BZAW 73; Berlin: Alfred Töpelmann, 1953), and refined further by Wolfgang Richter (“Traum und Traumdeutung im AT: Ihre Form und Verwendung,” BZ 7 [1963]: 202–220).

Similar spatial locations are found in Virgil (Aen. 6) and Ovid (Metam. 11). 82 Brelich, “The Place of Dreams,” 299; see Hesiod, Theog. 212. 83 Brelich, “The Place of Dreams,” 300–301. dream-visions in antiquity 39 Assessment of Dream-Visions in Graeco-Roman Culture To summarize the evidence discussed thus far, it is important to note a number of developments. Because the purpose of this inquiry is to determine the general attitudes toward dream-visions in antiquity, evidence for and against the belief in dream-visions as a reliable medium of revelation has been presented synchronically.

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